Real tech is trying to catch up to fictional tech

Discuss the technology of any incarnation of Ghost in the Shell
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Freitag
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Post by Freitag »

tactile (and visual?) feedback for robotic hands.

http://www.engadget.com/2009/08/22/vide ... ity-speed/

The comment that high speed objects need special handling was interesting.
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Freitag
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Post by Freitag »

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 212312.htm

Implantable short term memories.

Is this perhaps the right way to interface with a computer? (at least for retrieving facts from a remote server)
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Post by marto_motoko »

Freitag wrote:http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 212312.htm

Implantable short term memories.

Is this perhaps the right way to interface with a computer? (at least for retrieving facts from a remote server)
O___ô Holy Poop.

I have to admit, THAT, is very very cool!
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Who are you? Who slips into my robot body and whispers to my ghost?
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Post by Freitag »

And now here is direct nerve stimulation to create vision.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lXRHPKIvLc

Some grossness in the video - you get to watch eye surgery.
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Post by Freitag »

And more vision technology - restoring sight in the blind.

http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site ... ewsLang=en
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Post by Freitag »

Not quite an implant, but it's an interface helper module.


http://www.motherboard.tv/2010/3/23/vid ... -your-eyes
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Post by Freitag »

Ooo
They tested them on cats who were anesthetized but whose eyes were functioning. The electrodes recorded the signals from the eyes of the cats as they were shown visual images.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20100418/hl_ ... in_implant

Is that what you make 'interceptors' out of?


http://www.popsci.com/technology/articl ... ivity-cats


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EDIT: Added pictures and new link
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Post by Freitag »

Artificial muscles

Brain implants (as a first step to external memory?)
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Post by Freitag »

Sort of a synopsis of the present state of neural interfaces

http://hplusmagazine.com/articles/neuro ... tal-memory

The ability to port data in and out of consciousness has been demonstrated in multiple capacities with multiple interfaces ranging from low-fidelity non-invasive to high-fidelity radically invasive. Although these technologies seem like science fiction, they are being vigorously explored by academic, medical, and commercial interests, with companies like BrainGate seeking patents on multiple neural interfaces and software platforms simultaneously
Some of the comments are worth reading too.
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Post by Freitag »

Better than a neural interface, what about a connection inside EVERY cell???
University of California, Merced (UCM) researchers have created a part-human, part-machine device that features a nano-sized transistor embedded in a cell-like membrane that is powered by the cell's fuel. The researchers say the device could be used to relay information about disease-related proteins inside the cell membrane, and eventually lead to new ways to read and influence brain or nerve cells. "This device is as close to the seamless marriage of biological and electronic structures as anything else that people did before," says UCM's Aleksandr Noy. The transistor is based on a carbon nanotube, a tiny straw-shaped material made from a single curved layer of carbon atoms arranged like the panels of a soccer ball. The carbon nanotube transistor was coated with a lipid bilayer and an ion pump was added, which is fueled by a solution of adenosine tri-phosphate. The ion pump changes the electrical charge within the cell, which then changes the charge in the transistor. However, researchers say that in future versions of the device an outside electrical current could power the device, which could enable the transistor to monitor and treat diseases.

http://news.discovery.com/tech/transist ... chine.html
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Post by Freitag »

Been thinking about all these bionic eye things as I contemplate some sort of corrective procedure for my own eyes.

http://www.medgadget.com/archives/2010/ ... ope_1.html

This article covers inserting a magnification lens into an eye damaged by Macular Degeneration. I noted that it provided only 2.5x magnification (from the video).

Anyway, I started wondering just how much telescopy (is that even a word?) you could get from something jammed in your eye and I found this article that says you get about twice the diameter of the lens in magnification. So if you fill a 6mm pupil (that is an average pupil at full dilation) you could get 12x magnification from it. On one hand that is not bad (I have a camera that has 10x zoom and it is pretty sweet), but it's still not Steve Austin good - he got a 20x zoom out of the deal.

And to be really useful, the device would have to have a variable zoom from 1x (or even a macro function?) all of the way up to the maximum useful zoom.

With "oil immersion" (which is better explained here) you can get a higher magnification. The magnification article references a difference between 800x and 1200x for a microscopic zoom so the additional 50% may be the contribution of the oil. So going back to the telescopic power of 12x, we might be about to get closer to the bionic 20x, topping out at 18x.

Any optics people out there that can add data points?
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Post by Freitag »

Nanotech is one of the core technologies of GitS. We're getting closer to that too. But still a long way off.

http://io9.com/5602494/quantum-electron ... technology
Quantum electron submarine holds the key to real, practical nanotechnology

Quantum electron submarine holds the key to real, practical nanotechnologyIn order to achieve levels of nanotechnology depicted in science fiction, we need to build machines one atom at a time. We're not there yet, but now we've got a powerful, indirect way to manipulate individual atoms.

Before this new breakthrough, the closest we had gotten to individual atom manipulation was to rather clumsily push atoms around using a scanning tunnelling microscope, or STM. This microscope has a stylus that is only one atom thick, from which it shoots electrons to obtain images on the atomic scale. Although this method did allow direct control of individual atoms, it was a rough, inefficient process that didn't offer much hope of acquiring the precision necessary for nanotechnology.

That may be about to change, thanks to Richard Palmer, Peter Sloan, and Sumet Sakulsermsuk of the UK's University of Birmingham. They placed the stylus of an STM in a tiny indent on a thin slice of silicon, and then emitted electrons from the stylus. The electrons burrowed into the silicons and traveled like a quantum wave function. This allowed them to avoid surface imperfections that would otherwise obstruct their path. The researchers have dubbed this electron wave a "quantum submarine."

Quantum electron submarine holds the key to real, practical nanotechnology

Now, here's the important part as far as nanotechnology is concerned. The electrons broke the chemical bonds holding chlorobenzene molecules to the surface of the silicon crystal. With those molecules dispatched, it's now possible to manipulate the atoms on the silicon surface. The researchers suggest one could manufacture silicon wafers using just this method, in which tiny pits are created on the surface into which electrons can be injected.

The resulting electron waves would then shape and pattern the surface according to the placement and power of the wave, allowing precise manipulation of the silicon's individual atoms, which would be a huge step towards eventually achieving the nanotechnology of science fiction.
In GitS they have millions of nanotech robots doing all sorts of things including the 16^2 skin sensors. If those things are built one at a time, then they will be prohibitively expensive.

But we have to be able to build one, before we can make the assembly line that builds tens of billions that will be needed.
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